The Stain of Blood


Blood may be washed away but the stain of the blood can last for a long time – consider Lady Macbeth, her crimes years in the past, still waking every night into the nightmare of the guilt and shame of what she has done. Does the same destiny await the Butchers Abhisit and Suthep? On the face of it, Suthep seems to be a wholly self-satisfied knave largely untroubled by the thought process but is Abhisit the same? Is that what he learned from his privileged Etonian education and his gentleman’s PPE degree at Oxford?

Reminders of his ordering the killings of pro-democracy demonstrators will not all be psychological – some will be physical too. The relatives of one of the protestors killed by troops under the order of the Abhisit regime have begun filing complaints with the police about the actions and the killings. If this happens in a number of cases, it is possible that the Butchers may be entangled in legal proceedings for many years – until last week, it was possible to believe that all of these cases would just be brushed under the carpet, as cases against the designated organs of the establishment always seem to be in Thailand. Yet the Electoral Commission’s decision to dissolve the Democrat Party may mean that all of this has changed. If the dissolution goes ahead, it presumably indicates that the establishment no longer considers Abhisit and his pals as designated agencies and so it will be open season on them. If that is indeed the case, then there must be a genuine chance (slim perhaps but genuine nevertheless) that Abhisit will be forced to stand trial for whatever crime he is deemed to have committed resulting from the deaths of protestors (and who knows how many more there will be in the next week or two). Will he too spend the rest of his life as a fugitive from Thai justice?

I imagine this consideration must have had some influence on his decision to appoint General Anupong as head of the Committee for Resolution of Emergency Situations (although there is a story that Suthep is still actually in charge, although that just seems to be face-saving spin). Military officers do not have to face trial for the acts they commit, as the conspirators and henchpersons behind the 2006 coup demonstrate.

Samak to Struggle On; Klong Prem Women’s Prison; Thai Rugby


The talk today is of the current administration lasting until the end of the year. This is on the basis that it will take six months for the Constitution Court to reach a decision about dissolution of political parties accused of electoral fraud. There is little if any enthusiasm in society as a whole for an immediate dissolution of parliament and another election – outside of the anti-democracy movement and certain others of the unnamed. Workshy quisling Abhisit Vejjajiva is as usual behaving extremely shabbily and trying to worm himself into power.

The Bangkok Post has an interesting story about life in the Klong Prem Women’s Prison. Some 4,400 women are currently incarcerated in the prison, mostly it seems for dealing in ya ba (amphetamines). Conditions are pretty grim – daytime offers not much apart from hanging around outside but the twelve night hours involve occupying a space so confined that the prisoners have to sleep on their sides in rooms full of people. There are no leg irons such as in the next door men’s prison but treatment is still not very good. Well, they are being punished of course for what they have done but there is an additional role for prison in a civilised country, which is to help prisoners become people who do not feel themselves compelled to repeat their crimes because of no other options. It is not clear how well this aspect is being conducted. There are some philanthropic and Buddhist groups who help with meditation, religious education and the like but that may be of secondary importance when people need to find money and work.

Thai rugby is improving but is still behind the ‘elite Asian’ group of Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Arabian Gulf and Kazakhstan. A divisional structure has been set up and countries can be promoted and relegated, so that competitions will revolve around games which are more competitive – it is difficult to improve when one side is hugely better than another and it also leads to loss of interest and motivation. Size would seem to be important in rugby and that is always likely to be a problem for Thai teams.

Samak to Struggle On; Klong Prem Women’s Prison; Thai Rugby


The talk today is of the current administration lasting until the end of the year. This is on the basis that it will take six months for the Constitution Court to reach a decision about dissolution of political parties accused of electoral fraud. There is little if any enthusiasm in society as a whole for an immediate dissolution of parliament and another election – outside of the anti-democracy movement and certain others of the unnamed. Workshy quisling Abhisit Vejjajiva is as usual behaving extremely shabbily and trying to worm himself into power.

The Bangkok Post has an interesting story about life in the Klong Prem Women’s Prison. Some 4,400 women are currently incarcerated in the prison, mostly it seems for dealing in ya ba (amphetamines). Conditions are pretty grim – daytime offers not much apart from hanging around outside but the twelve night hours involve occupying a space so confined that the prisoners have to sleep on their sides in rooms full of people. There are no leg irons such as in the next door men’s prison but treatment is still not very good. Well, they are being punished of course for what they have done but there is an additional role for prison in a civilised country, which is to help prisoners become people who do not feel themselves compelled to repeat their crimes because of no other options. It is not clear how well this aspect is being conducted. There are some philanthropic and Buddhist groups who help with meditation, religious education and the like but that may be of secondary importance when people need to find money and work.

Thai rugby is improving but is still behind the ‘elite Asian’ group of Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Arabian Gulf and Kazakhstan. A divisional structure has been set up and countries can be promoted and relegated, so that competitions will revolve around games which are more competitive – it is difficult to improve when one side is hugely better than another and it also leads to loss of interest and motivation. Size would seem to be important in rugby and that is always likely to be a problem for Thai teams.